College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Sociology

Environment, Technology, & Community

 

Topical Areas:

 

Community and Space

The main purview of traditional community studies research is the place-dependent interactions of people, social institutions, and their environments. Paired with these are the non-place-dependent social networks and spatial processes through which power and social and natural resources are concentrated and flow across space in uneven ways. These perspectives on communities and space are complementary, with a deeper conceptual appreciation of each one lending richness and depth of understanding to the other.  

Faculty in this area include:


Environmental Inequality

Environmental inequality inquires into who benefits from the extraction and use of natural resources, who enjoys access to environmental amenities, and who doesn't.  As a field of inquiry, environmental inequality is deeply concerned with uneven distribution of and exposure to environmental burdens, such as chemical contaminants or desertification. Intimately tied to environmental inequality are normative debates over environmental justice.  As such, the study of environmental inequality demands lively consideration of what is and debates over what should be.

Faculty in this area include:


Structural Human Ecology and Globalization

Structural human ecology examines the couplings of social and political systems and the complex ecosystems that sustain them at all scale levels. Globalization examines interactions of local, national, and international systems as they impact and are impacted by political, economic, and environmental change processes. From the local community to the nation state and beyond, these structures and dynamics are examined with a macrosociological focus on organized social collectivities.

Faculty in this area include:

     

Science, Technology, and Risk

Science plays two, sometimes competing roles that alters ecosystems: it generates knowledge about gaining access to nature's capital and services as well as spawns new technologies for doing the same, and it is the principal institution for assessing environmental impacts.  Social and political processes partly shape these scientific roles, the risks associated with new ecosystem knowledge and technologies, and the public policies developed to protect the environment or manage technological and environmental risks.

Faculty in this area include:

 

 

Topical Areas Include:

Community and Space
Environmental Inequality
Structural Human Ecology & Globalization
Science, Technology, & Risk

 

 

 

 

Sociology Department, PO Box 644020, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164-4020, Ph: 509-335-4595, Fax: 509-335-6419, Contact Us