College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Sociology

Graduate Students on the Job Market

 

Morgan M. Millar

Joseph Kremer

New Job Placements:

Meredith Conover-Williams
Assistant professor, Humboldt State University starting Fall 2013

Michelle L. Edwards
Assistant professor, Texas Christian University starting Fall 2013

Lindsey Trimble O’Connor
Aassistant professor,  California State University-Channel Islands starting Fall 2013

Ben Messer
Project Analyst at Research Into Action, Portland, Or.

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Morgan M. Millar

morgan_millar@wsu.edu

Curriculum Vitae

Ph.D. 2011
Dissertation Title:
Interdisciplinary Research Among U.S. Doctoral Graduates: An Examination of Definitions, Measurement, Early Career Outcomes, and Sex Differences.

Dissertation Committee:
Monica Kirkpatrick Johnson (chair), Julie A. Kmec, Don A. Dillman 

Areas of Interest:
Sociology of education; inequalities of gender, social class, and race/ethnicity; survey research methodology; labor market inequality; sociology of the family

Dissertation description:
My dissertation examines interdisciplinary research, a topic of increased interest within the academic and scientific communities. In the first part of my project, I use cognitive interviews with doctoral candidates to illustrate the complexities of defining and measuring interdisciplinary research. I discuss the diversity of ways interdisciplinarity is conceptualized, and the consequences this can have for measuring and studying, as well as advancing, interdisciplinary work. I then use data from the Survey of Earned Doctorates and the Survey of Doctorate Recipients to examine whether conducting interdisciplinary dissertation research affects a variety of early career outcomes among doctoral graduates in the sciences and social sciences. I illustrate how interdisciplinary doctoral graduates’ early career placements may differ from those of graduates whose research is not interdisciplinary, and consider how these differences could affect future career success. I also use these two data sources in the third analysis of my dissertation, in which I determine if there are sex differences in participation in interdisciplinary doctoral research, and whether interdisciplinary research has any consequences for sex-based inequalities in early career outcomes of doctoral graduates in the STEM fields. I discuss how my findings differ from popular conceptions, and the implications this has for decreasing sex inequality within the scientific labor market.

 

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Joseph Kremer

joseph.kremer@email.wsu.edu

Curriculum Vitae

Ph.D. Candidate

Dissertation Title:
Monetary Environmental Enforcement Outcomes in Washington and EPA Region Ten 2007-2011:  A Story of Equality

Dissertation description:
Combining a criminological and environmental justice framework, this project assesses the impact of community level demographic factors on the sentencing outcomes of EPA administrative enforcement cases.  Previous sociological research has only briefly explored whether communities of varying demographics are being equally protected from environmental risks through the use of monetary fines in instances of noncompliance.  Alternatively, little criminological research has utilized the theory of social disorganization to address disparities in sentences of organizational crimes within neighborhoods.  Using a mixed methods approach including both regression and qualitative comparative analysis (QCA), I assess whether the financial outcomes of such cases are significantly impacted by the socio-demographic characteristics of the surrounding community.  In all, demographic factors were found to have no significant influence on fine assessment or severity and social disorganization theory as tested here was unable to provide theoretical insight regarding environmental enforcement activities.  Factors found to significantly influence fine assessment and severity included the characteristics of the facility, the severity of the offense, and type of offense.

 

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