College of Arts and Sciences

Department of History

Current History Graduate Students

 


James Anderson

I am a first-year MA student studying Public History with Dr. Rob McCoy. I graduated from Seattle Pacific University with a BA in History and a minor in Music. My undergraduate thesis explored the differences between historical accounts of the 1909 Spokane Free Speech Fight. At this point, my research will probably involve the history of the Pacific Northwest in some form. Beyond history, my passion is nature photography. I look forward to exploring a new landscape in the Palouse and surrounding areas.

James Anderson

Greg Atkins
Pullman

I am a third-year PhD student studying with Dr. Matthew Sutton. My research focuses on how Colorado Springs carved out a national reputation over the last 150 years. Initially touted as a refined resort in the West, boosters of Colorado Springs later emphasized health, tourism, the defense industry, and evangelical Christianity to promote the city. Throughout these iterations, boosters and religious leaders worked closely. As these campaigns built upon and constrained each other, they also fed and set important precedents for what became the “Sunbelt.” It was a pleasure to be elected the Graduate Studies Representative, and I look forward to serving as a bridge between graduate students and the faculty to further strengthen the department overall. In another life before the all-consuming responsibilities of graduate school, I hiked, biked, and remodeled cars and houses. Given the right amount of peer pressure and favorable social conditions, my friends and colleagues can still lure me back into these pastimes.

Greg Atkins

Brett Bell
Pullman


Jennifer Binczewski
Pullman

Jennifer is a Doctoral Candidate working with Dr. Jesse Spohnholz. My research fields are Reformation, early modern Europe and world history. I received my B.A. in history from Whitworth University and I completed my M.A. in ancient history at Kingís College London. My research examines the role of recusant widows in the preservation of Catholicism in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England.

Jennifer Binczewski

David Bolingbroke

I am a first year PhD candidate working with Dr. Jeffrey Sanders. I grew up in Reno, Nevada. My research focuses on environmental history in the American West. I am interested in relationships between natural resources and their users. My Master's thesis focuses on northern Nevada's Pyramid Lake and lower Truckee River fishery. Pyramid Lake is home to the largest cutthroat trout in the world, as well as a fish only found in this one place, the cui-ui sucker. Both are vital resources to the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe whose reservation encompasses the lake. My thesis narrates the ruin and restoration of the fishery, emphasizing what restoration meant to different resource users over time. I have a B.A. from Brigham Young University and an M.A. from Utah State University. 

David Bolingbroke

Trevor Bond
Pullman


Michael "Mickey" Dennis
Pullman

I am a second year public history Master's student studying with Dr. Orlan Svingen. My research is focused on Mennonite Conscientious Objectors during World War I in Kansas and how their ethno - religious differences affected their treatment at the hands of other Kansans, the military, and the government. I'm looking forward to being the M.A. Student Representative and helping other Master's students with their potential questions or concerns. I grew up in Carbondale, Illinois, before moving to St. Louis to attend Webster University where I graduated with a B.A. in History in 2013. Soccer is my favorite hobby. I have developed a love for the game after playing for 16 years including 4 in college. I support/watch Arsenal when I can find the time (although it's often not relaxing!)

Michael Dennis

Daniel Fogt


Joni Ford
Pullman

Joni Ford is a first year Masters student. She received her BA in Social Science: History from Lewis-Clarks State College in 2013. She focuses on US History, primarily 20th century, with an emphasis in women and gender.

Joni Ford

Hans-Petter Grav
Vancouver

I am a second-year Ph.D. student focusing on U.S. race and ethnicity. I grew up in Norway, but earned my academic degrees in the United States. I did my M.A. at Montana State University, Bozeman, where I received the history department's Best Paper by an M.A. student award, in 2010, for a paper entitled "The First and the Sixth Pearl Harbor: Norwegian-American Identity at the Onset of World War II." In Pullman, I offered a poster presentation on "Bleached Dresses Only: The Absent Ethnic Dimension in the Vineland Irrigation Project" at the 2012 Academic Showcase. I also served as a student curator on this topic for MASC's exhibit "Vineland: Shaping Paradise – Lewiston–Clarkston Improvement Company Records, 1890–1920," which opened in April 2012. I recently published the paper "When the Beast Saved the Day and Yellow Jack Got Lost: The Story of General Butler and the Yellow Fever Epidemic That Never Took Place" in the spring 2012 issue of the Southern Historian. I am currently a GTA for the RCI program at the Vancouver campus, and I serve as the Vancouver HGSA representative.

Hans-Petter Grav

Fred Hardyway
Pullman

Fred hails from the wonderfully diverse and scenic state of Kansas! He graduated with a Bachelor in history and Master from Friends University in Kansas. Currently a first year Doctoral student, Fredís interests lay in the general field of World history, with a primary field focus on West Africa and a secondary field focus in Atlantic world. His current research is engrossed on the history of African archery technology throughout the continent, but in particular the dispersion of that technology to other peoples outside Africa.

Fred Hardyway

Jason Hogstad

I am a first year MA student with an interest in the historical roots of the urban-rural divide, a background in public history interpretation and a love of outdoor recreation. Under the supervision of Dr. Boag, I will examine the changing perceptions of homesteaders in the United States in the 1910s to better understand how and why shifts in the definition of socially acceptable land use occur and how such definitions and perceptions shape contemporary policy-making lessons that can be applied to current environmental policy and cross-border relations.

Jason Hogstad

Tyler Kinsella
Pullman

My name is Tyler Kinsella and I just moved to Pullman from Saint Paul, Minnesota. I attended Saint Johnís University in Collegeville, MN for my undergraduate work and received my major in History. Here at Pullman, Iím in my first semester of a Masterís program and focusing my work in Modern Germany, particularly World War II and Holocaust memory.

Tyler Kinsella

Daniel Kotin

I am a first-year PhD candidate studying Modern World and African History with Dr. Candice Goucher. My research interests include nineteenth and twentieth century colonialism, imperialism, and decolonization in the Atlantic World.

Daniel Kotin

Heidi Kyle
ABD—Spokane


Carey McCormack
Vancouver

  • Received my bachelor's in Asian and European history at California State University, Long Beach
  • Received my master's degree in World history with an emphasis in South and Southeast Asia at Cal. State, Long Beach
  • Currently working on a PhD in World history
  • Research interests include South Asia, Southeast Asia and World history from the long 18th century to the end of the nineteenth century, gender and sexuality, historical theory, and history of plant collection/dispersion and sea exploration.
Carey McCormack

Katie Perry
Pullman

I received my BA in History (2006) and my MA in Modern European History (2009) from the University of North Carolina, Wilmington. I am currently a fourth year doctoral candidate, with Heather Streets-Salter as my advisor. My areas of study include: Modern Europe, Modern Britain, and Imperialism. My dissertation examines the role of British Parliament in the process of detention during Kenya’s State of Emergency, 1952-60. I am specifically interested in how Parliament handled allegations of abuse from the numerous detention camps and villages that handled an estimated one million detainees. 

Katie Perry

Calen Rau

Calen is a first year M.A. student working with Dr. Raymond Sun. His research interests include Genocide and Ethnic Cleansing, Modern Europe, Religion, and Memory with particular emphasis on the Holocaust and its remembrance in East-Central Europe. He received his B.A. in History and Religious Studies at California State University Fullerton in 2014.

Calen Rau

Nathan Roberts


Chris Schlect
ABD—teaching in Moscow, ID

Chris Schlect

Sarah Schraeder
Pullman

Sarah is a second-year M.A. student working with Dr. Raymond Sun. Her research fields include Modern Germany, Modern Europe, memory and world history. She received her B.A. in history with a minor in political science from California State University Stanislaus in Turlock, California in 2012. Her current research focuses on the memorialization of a set of smaller concentration camps developed under the Nazi regime beginning in 1933 called the Emslandlager (camps in the Emsland region located in north-western Germany). She is specifically interested in the process of memorialization in this region and how it compares to larger memorialization projects in Germany before and after unification.

Sarah Schraeder

Allison Sellers

I am a second-year doctoral student working with Dr. Candice Goucher. My research concerns emergent religions among people of color in the 20th-century Atlantic world. Specifically, I explore the articulation of black supremacist ideologies within a number of new religious movements in the interwar period. I contend that such movements reveal the concurrent discourses and unique historical circumstances that informed the ideological choices of Afro-Atlantic peoples. By examining their development, I hope to illuminate the diverse strategies employed by people of color as they conceived of their place in the world, negotiated their status, and challenged racial hierarchies. In addition to completing my coursework at WSU and pursuing my research goals, I am a teaching assistant for RCI and president of the Gamma Psi chapter of Phi Alpha Theta.

Allison Sellers

Amir Selmanovic
Pullman


Dong Jo Shin
Vancouver


Benjamin Smith
South Idaho


Sikang Song
Pullman

I am a fourth year PhD Candidate working with Dr. David Pietz. My research fields are Modern China, World History, and Global Environmental History. After I graduated from Beijing Normal University with a M.A. degree in 2010, I entered the PhD program at WSU. My research focuses on the ecological, social, and cultural constructions of tobacco growing and tobacco industry in North China during the early twentieth century.

Sikang Song

Brian Stack
Pullman

I am a second year MA student in the history program. Before attending WSU, I attended the University of Rhode Island where I earned BA degrees in History and Philosophy. My research focuses on how sexualities were created, enforced, and changed in the American west at the turn of the twentieth century.

Brian Stack

Mandy Townsley
Pullman

Mandy Townsley is a Doctoral Candidate working with Dr. Raymond Sun.  Her research fields are Modern Britain, Modern Europe and World History. She received her bachelor's degree from The University of Montana and her Master's from Washington State University.  Her dissertation focuses on the concurrent remembering and forgetting of the Great War in Ireland during the war and through the Irish Free State period.

Mandy Townsley

Renée A. Torres

Renee’s research interests are intersectionality, media representations of race and gender, and journalism history and its influence on culture.

As an undergraduate, she completed a senior honors thesis entitled “Bulletproof Betty: Sexism on the Frontlines with Women War Correspondents From the 1960s to Present”. The research for “Bulletproof Betty” has shown that sexism, in the news industry, has changed over time from overt sexism to benevolent sexism – or one that is concerned with women’s safety or ability. This project is meant to challenge the ideas that sexism is a relic of the past and that feminism is harmful to the news industry. By studying the microcosm of war correspondence, it can be suggested that the gendering of news and sexist tendencies of one field is reflective of American culture as a whole.

Renee was born and raised in southern California, and will be learning to adapt to having an actual winter here at WSU. In her free time she enjoys reading comic books, anything Harry Potter, and finding new restaurants and foods to try. She plans on pursuing her doctorate and becoming a professor.

Renee Torres

Jacki Tyler
Pullman

Jacki Hedlund Tyler is a Doctoral Candidate working with Dr. Peter Boag. Her research fields are American History, Public History, and World History. She received her Bachelor’s degree from Washington State University, and her Master’s degree from Arizona State University. Her dissertation focuses on the construction of gender, race, and citizenship through immigration restrictions and legal exclusions in Oregon, from 1830 to 1859. Her article "The Color and Gender of Citizenship: Immigration Restriction in the Development of Oregon," was published by the journal Western Legal History.

Jacki Tyler

Jacob Wells
Pullman

Jacob received his BA in History from the University of Alabama in December of 2012.  He is currently studying under Dr. Jesse Spohnholz and is studying religious and political relations during the Protestant Reformation. Other interests include how both Protestants and Catholics were effected during the Thirty Years War and the Jewish experience during the Protestant Reformation.  He is also a Teaching Assistant for the Roots of Contemporary Issues program.

Jacob Wells

Joseph Wilson
Army/Philippines

My name is Joseph Wilson, and I'm in the World History program at WSU. I'm enrolled in the thesis option, and my thesis will compare the relative success of Amilcar Cabral and Samora Machel as revolutionary leaders in their respective struggle for independence from Portugal. I will use the concept of Trust and Trust Theory to help make my argument.

I'm originally from Westland, Michigan. I'm married, and I have two children, both boys, aged 7 and 11. I'm currently in my 21st year of active duty service in the US Army. I'm assigned to the 1st Special Forces Group in Okinawa, Japan, and currently serving in the Philippines. I'm a 1990 graduate of the University of Michigan, with a BA in History and English. I enjoy reading and participating in running events. I am a sport fan, and I'm loyal to all my hometown Detroit sports teams; but I always root for the Cougs (unless they're playing the Wolverines).

Joe Wilson

 

 

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