College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Critical Culture, Gender, and Race Studies

CES Internships: Community-Based Option

This option emphasizes community empowerment, research, social justice, and building bridges. It provides students with the opportunity to conduct community-based research that both is grounded in the local community and seeks to empower those in the community. This option seeks to fulfill the mission of ethnic studies in producing community-based and community-relevant scholarship that works to advance the interests of our communities.

Responsibility

Taking part in an internship is serious business, even though it is far more independently oriented than other options. Each student is expected to spend 10 hours per week engaging in research, meeting with faculty mentor, and developing proposal.

Evaluation

Research Journal: Every week, students are to write a two- to three-page journal on research efforts, struggles, lessons, and obstacles. This is an opportunity to think about the week's experiences, in terms of happenings, struggles, powerful learning experiences, critically reflecting on field research in the context of readings and individual discussions. It should be purely a summarizing of involvement, but encompass a critical examination of that week's classes.

Research Portfolio: Students are to keep a folder that documents the research experience. It should include: (1) research project proposal, (2) paper prospectus, (3) statement of community relevance, (4) statement of ethics, (5) research questions, (6) annotated bibliography, and (7) documents to be determined with faculty advisor.

Final Research Paper: The emphasis of this option is on the final paper, warranting a substantive final effort. Although it is imagined that this paper be 20–25 pages, individual consideration will be made for creative projects and those that place focus on community empowerment.

Self-Evaluation: Each student must turn in a three- to four-page self-evaluation of their own involvement with the internship, specifically discussing effort, fulfillment of responsibilities, and experience. Additionally, each student must turn in a two- to three-page evaluation of the faculty sponsor/experience, providing clear feedback about the support and usefulness of this internship.

Timeline

  1. Meet with faculty advisor to discuss project, feasibility of research, and community in which work will be conducted (this needs to take place in fall of junior year or no more than five months before internship).
  2. Submit proposal to internship coordinator.
  3. In consultation with internship coordinator, contact community and other individuals/organizations crucial to the advancement of the study.
  4. In consultation with internship coordinator, solidify details and procedures for upcoming internship. It is crucial that students prepare themselves so that the first week of the internship semester begins smoothly.
  5. Throughout the semester, students conducting a community-based research project must spend at minimum 10 hours conducting research as part of their larger project.
  6. Every week, students must write in a journal (which will be read by the internship coordinator and the student's faculty advisor) that touches upon the happenings during those weeks, as well as a discussion of problems, obstacles, dilemmas, etc. At minimum, each student must write 15 times, averaging two to three pages per entry.
  7. Upon the conclusion of the internship, each student must submit their final paper, along with portfolio and bibliography.
  8. Each student must turn in a three- to four-page self-evaluation of their own involvement with the internship, specifically discussing effort, fulfillment of responsibilities, and experience.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Critical Culture, Gender, and Race Studies, PO Box 644010, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-4010
Wilson-Short Hall 111 • 509-335-2605 • Fax: 509-335-8338 • Contact Us